A lasting tribute to a legendary prosecutor

CAROL DeMARE Staff Writer
Section: Capital Region,  Page: B5

Date: Thursday, June 1, 2006

To honor a fatherly figure who's just a phone call away, Albany County District Attorney David Soares will dedicate "The Greenberg Room" on Tuesday.


In naming a large conference room in his new office for legendary District Attorney Sol Greenberg , Soares is giving the man he admires a place in the office. "We moved into a brand new building in December, and Sol has been an institution in this community, and I wanted to have something here that he could have a piece of," Soares said.


There was a feeling in the old office in the Albany County Courthouse of Greenberg's presence, he added.


"I still have his ash tray here," he said. Greenberg was a pipe smoker. "And I have his desk."


"Sol was such a fatherly figure, always supportive," Soares continued. "He gave me my first job."


A district attorney deals with "pretty tough stuff, and Sol has always been a comforting father figure," Soares said.


Naming the room recognizes him in the new Judicial Center. Soares has been calling it the Greenberg Room since December when his staff moved into the new building where the criminal courts are located. The room has photos on the wall of Greenberg and the late Dan Dwyer , longtime chief assistant district attorney. There are also black and white pictures of old downtown Albany.


Greenberg, 84, stepped down in 2000. He had held the office for more than 25 years, one of the longest tenured district attorneys in the state and a political institution in Albany.


Soares sees Greenberg as "a very calming spirit. I looked at his picture, and I started thinking about him, and he's always been a phone call away for me. Whenever I run into him, he's always offered fatherly advice, and he has a very genuine love for this office. We're moving forward, and we want to make sure that we don't forget where we came from."


The invitation has a photo of Greenberg on the front and lists 89 names of attorneys who served on Greenberg's staff.


"There's a lot of legal community here," Soares said.


Appointments


A Loudonville attorney who has worked in appeals courts and a former deputy press secretary to Gov. George Pataki have been named to key positions with the New York State Bar Association.


Sebrina A. Barrett of Loudonville is the new director of administrative services. She will handle a variety of duties, including the development of policies and special projects, writing reports and speeches, and assisting state bar officers, the executive director and board of directors of the New York Bar Foundation.


Barrett previously was a staff attorney, law clerk and judicial clerk with the state Court of Appeals, the Appellate Division, Third Department, and the Supreme Court of Missouri.


She holds an undergraduate degree in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a law degree from Southern Illinois University School of Law, where she was editor of the Law Journal.


Andrew J. Rush of Albany is director of media services and public affairs for the organization. He will work with state bar leaders on opportunities to increase public awareness of legal issues.


Rush worked as a deputy press secretary to Pataki for three years and served as the governor's traveling spokesman. A native of Fulton, Oswego County, he graduated from the University at Albany and began his career as an aide in the office of state Sen. James W. Wright, a Watertown Republican. He later served as director of government relations for the Manufacturers Association of Central New York and press secretary for the Division of Budget.





Seminar


The Albany County Bar Association is sponsoring a lunch-hour Continuing Legal Education seminar June 8 at the Hampton Inn, downtown Albany, entitled "HIPAA: Health Care Privacy Law Update," offering 1.5 hours of credit.


Julleann Diamond of Lemery Greisler will speak. Call 445-7691 to register.





Carol DeMare can be reached at 454-5431 or by e-mail at cdemare@timesunion.com. Michele Morgan Bolton contributed.